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Q&A How does Caveat work?

One of the fonts available (to me) on Google Docs is Caveat. The following is in 18-point Caveat on Google Docs: I found that Caveat is available at https://github.com/googlefonts/caveat/tree/ma...

0 answers  ·  posted 4y ago by msh210‭  ·  edited 3y ago by Alexei‭

Question google-fonts fonts
#2: Post edited by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2020-10-23T13:06:15Z (over 3 years ago)
added tag
  • One of the fonts available (to me) on Google Docs is Caveat. The following is in 18-point Caveat on Google Docs:
  • > ![(sample)](https://software.codidact.com/uploads/e6DU299Txhu6D3hW3GKk1uta)
  • I found that Caveat is available at https://github.com/googlefonts/caveat/tree/master/fonts/TTF, from which I downloaded it. I then typed the same text in Microsoft Word and this resulted:
  • > ![(sample)](https://software.codidact.com/uploads/q5pgrUo4GBsRT2LQ4s5cW3bR)
  • Notice that, in the latter screenshot, each letter has the same shape wherever it appears. In the former, however, there are multiple shapes for the same letter. My question, then, is twofold:
  • 1. Why the difference? Why doesn't the font appear the same way in both places?
  • 2. In the first screenshot, the same letter appears in very similar contexts but with different shapes. What determines the shape each time? In other words, what rules are applied for each letter to determine which shape it will have?
  • One of the fonts available (to me) on Google Docs is Caveat. The following is in 18-point Caveat on Google Docs:
  • > ![(sample)](https://software.codidact.com/uploads/e6DU299Txhu6D3hW3GKk1uta)
  • I found that Caveat is available at https://github.com/googlefonts/caveat/tree/master/fonts/TTF, from which I downloaded it. I then typed the same text in Microsoft Word and this resulted:
  • > ![(sample)](https://software.codidact.com/uploads/q5pgrUo4GBsRT2LQ4s5cW3bR)
  • Notice that, in the latter screenshot, each letter has the same shape wherever it appears. In the former, however, there are multiple shapes for the same letter. My question, then, is twofold:
  • 1. Why the difference? Why doesn't the font appear the same way in both places?
  • 2. In the first screenshot, the same letter appears in very similar contexts but with different shapes. What determines the shape each time? In other words, what rules are applied for each letter to determine which shape it will have?
#1: Initial revision by user avatar msh210‭ · 2020-08-23T08:36:57Z (almost 4 years ago)
How does Caveat work?
One of the fonts available (to me) on Google Docs is Caveat. The following is in 18-point Caveat on Google Docs:
> ![(sample)](https://software.codidact.com/uploads/e6DU299Txhu6D3hW3GKk1uta)

I found that Caveat is available at https://github.com/googlefonts/caveat/tree/master/fonts/TTF, from which I downloaded it. I then typed the same text in Microsoft Word and this resulted:
> ![(sample)](https://software.codidact.com/uploads/q5pgrUo4GBsRT2LQ4s5cW3bR)

Notice that, in the latter screenshot, each letter has the same shape wherever it appears. In the former, however, there are multiple shapes for the same letter. My question, then, is twofold:

1. Why the difference? Why doesn't the font appear the same way in both places?
2. In the first screenshot, the same letter appears in very similar contexts but with different shapes. What determines the shape each time? In other words, what rules are applied for each letter to determine which shape it will have?