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Q&A How to break infinite loop in CTE

Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown here...

posted 3y ago by Alexei‭  ·  last activity 3y ago by Alexei‭

Answer
#7: Post undeleted by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2021-04-20T15:49:31Z (about 3 years ago)
#6: Post edited by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2021-04-20T15:41:46Z (about 3 years ago)
  • Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown [here](https://dba.stackexchange.com/q/162298).
  • Basically, instead of accumulating values in an array, a string does this (way less efficiently for many records, I would say).
  • In this case, a query that seems to provide the results you are looking for is the following:
  • **Note:** considering how complex things might get (edge cases might add up to the logic), this type of query might be better be done in a language/framework like C++, Java or .NET, unless there is a very strong reason to remain in SQL. These allow for much more flexibility, considering the iterative nature of the algorithm (not so suitable for set based operations) and also provide way better-debugging capabilities.
  • Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown [here](https://dba.stackexchange.com/q/162298).
  • Basically, instead of accumulating values in an array, a string does this (way less efficiently for many records, I would say).
  • In this case, a query that seems to provide the results you are looking for is the following (some security check does not allow to post the query, so I am using SQL fiddle for sharing it):
  • http://sqlfiddle.com/#!18/a50101/1
  • **Note:** considering how complex things might get (edge cases might add up to the logic), this type of query might be better be done in a language/framework like C++, Java or .NET, unless there is a very strong reason to remain in SQL. These allow for much more flexibility, considering the iterative nature of the algorithm (not so suitable for set based operations) and also provide way better-debugging capabilities.
#5: Post edited by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2021-04-20T15:34:37Z (about 3 years ago)
  • Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown [here](https://dba.stackexchange.com/q/162298).
  • Basically, instead of accumulating values in an array, a string does this (way less efficiently for many records, I would say).
  • In this case, a query that seems to provide the results you are looking for is the following:
  • Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown [here](https://dba.stackexchange.com/q/162298).
  • Basically, instead of accumulating values in an array, a string does this (way less efficiently for many records, I would say).
  • In this case, a query that seems to provide the results you are looking for is the following:
  • **Note:** considering how complex things might get (edge cases might add up to the logic), this type of query might be better be done in a language/framework like C++, Java or .NET, unless there is a very strong reason to remain in SQL. These allow for much more flexibility, considering the iterative nature of the algorithm (not so suitable for set based operations) and also provide way better-debugging capabilities.
#4: Post deleted by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2021-04-20T15:33:13Z (about 3 years ago)
#3: Post edited by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2021-04-20T15:31:02Z (about 3 years ago)
  • Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown [here](https://dba.stackexchange.com/q/162298).
  • Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown [here](https://dba.stackexchange.com/q/162298).
  • Basically, instead of accumulating values in an array, a string does this (way less efficiently for many records, I would say).
  • In this case, a query that seems to provide the results you are looking for is the following:
#2: Post edited by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2021-04-20T15:30:34Z (about 3 years ago)
  • test
  • Estela's answer provides great insight about how to do it also in SQL Server. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be a build-in array functionality, so one way is to rely on strings as shown [here](https://dba.stackexchange.com/q/162298).
#1: Initial revision by user avatar Alexei‭ · 2021-04-20T15:30:22Z (about 3 years ago)
test