Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs

Dashboard
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

Hash sign as a path component in a user script's @match command prevents the script from running

+3
−0

I try to exactly match a login page in a website, for a user script manager (USM) script, which I run with Tampermonkey.

This pattern didn't work:

// @match        https://example.com/#/login

This pattern worked:

// @match        https://example.com/*

Why would the Hash sign (#) prevent the script from running?

By "prevent the script from running" I mean that Tampermonkey (version 4.13) just won't start the script on that webpage if the first pattern is used.

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

1 comment thread

In an URL, the `#` is called fragment identifier, followed by the actual fragment. (4 comments)

1 answer

+4
−0

The part after the hashtag is called a URI fragment. Unfortunately, Tampermonkey does not allow you to match hashtags.

This is arguably for good reason. The hashtag can easily change (and for single page applications, often does easily change) without a page reload. Since userscript managers load their scripts when the page loads, they simply can't match based on the URI fragment.

Therefore, you will have to check for the fragment in your script's code. It shouldn't be more difficult than just checking location.hash

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

0 comment threads

Sign up to answer this question »